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What Does A Well-Factored Monolith Look Like?

Microservices are very popular right now, because supposedly, they allow you to develop, deploy and maintain them separately. It allows you to keep a clean architecture and avoid coupling. A contrasting opinion is that a monolith can do these as well, and remains simpler to deploy and support. But it should be a well-factored monolith. […]

Code Inventory

Companies that handle physical goods usually want to keep their inventory to a minimum. As software developers, we should do the same. Physical Inventory Physical inventory is all the physical goods a company owns. Think buildings, computers, furniture, but also items they will sell, either directly or assembled. Product parts for example. Or food items […]

The Multiteam Monolith

The monolith is an architectural pattern where the software application consists of a single executable that is deployed as a whole. It can be difficult to work with when it is being maintained by a single team. But matters worsen if it is managed by multiple teams. Here’s why. How Monoliths Grow When a company […]

Running Locally

Many legacy applications are difficult to run locally, on the developer’s machine. I always recommend teams make it possible to run their code locally. After automated tests, it’s a powerful enabler for developers to improve the code quality. Here’s why. Working Offline In the past, internet connections weren’t always reliable or, when commuting, not available […]

Technical Debt At Startups

Should startups disregard code quality so that they can test their product-market fit as quickly as possible? Or should they write high quality code from the get-go? I used to think the former, but an interesting conversation with Kurt Biesemans made me change my mind. Although there is still room for exceptions, depending on the […]

Christmas Ham Story

Here’s a great story to get you thinking about how legacy code can build up (I can’t find who originally told it). At Christmas, a father prepares a Christmas ham. He cuts of both ends and puts it in the baking pan. His child asks why he cut off the two ends, wasting the meat. […]

5 Types of Technical Debt And Their Solution

Technical debt and legacy code are closely related but not exactly the same. Legacy code is a derogatory term to indicate old code that is no longer well-maintained. Technical debt, on the other hand, is debt accumulated in order to release software. It can be more than just your code. Let’s take a look at […]

Avoiding Technical Debt: Don’t Code

I’ve written about avoiding technical debt before, and probably will do so more in the future. There’s just so many ways to avoid it or at least limit its consequences. At the very least, you should be writing automated tests. But let’s look at another way to avoid technical debt: no writing the code at […]

What Does the Test Pyramid Mean?

I’ve written about the test pyramid before. It provides a guideline on the type of tests you need and how many. But recently, I got in a conversation on what the test pyramid actually means. Is it about code coverage? Or is it purely about the number of tests? A Brief Recap The test pyramid […]

Disaster-Release Ratio: What Is It And What Can It Mean for You?

I was recently on the Tiny DevOps podcast and mentioned the Disaster-Release Ratio metric. And although I’ve written about it before, but the podcast made me decide I should dedicate a separate article to it. But before we continue, I came up with this metric while at work with a client, but someone else might […]